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alex-neal:

HR Giger-esque set at Iris Van Herpen FW14

alex-neal:

HR Giger-esque set at Iris Van Herpen FW14

(via organization)

FILED UNDER: iris van herpen,
SOURCE: alex-neal
SOURCE: hoanbee

faraashah:

Telling people “if you don’t love yourself then no one can love you” sounds like a seriously dangerous, counterproductive, and destructive thing to do. This person most likely is unable to love themselves because they have never experienced it. They have never had anyone show them their worth and all their lovable qualities. And it’s okay to start to love yourself through someone else. But to stand in front of this fragile human being and tell them that basically the reason that nobody loves them (in their mind) is because of their own self-depracation? To tell them that they’re causing their own demise? That’s heartless and dismissive. 

(via queerandpresentdanger)

nolaojomu:

Possibly the most beautiful moment captured at the Golden Globes wp.me/pdqnq-nV 

nolaojomu:

Possibly the most beautiful moment captured at the Golden Globes 

SOURCE: nolaojomu

mrgolightly:

Karen O - The Moon Song

FILED UNDER: karen o, her,
SOURCE: mrgolightly

sonofbaldwin:

Wisdom sometimes comes from the unlikeliest of sources.

I must admit that this actually frightened me a little.

FILED UNDER: charles manson,
SOURCE: sonofbaldwin
So many people glorify and romanticise “busy”. I do not. I value purpose. I believe in resting in reason and moving in passion. If you’re always busy/moving, you will miss important details. I like the mountain. Still, but when it moves lands shift and earth quakes.
— Joseph Cook 

(via organization)


Installation, 1987, Candlestick Park 
By Jenny Holzer

Installation, 1987, Candlestick Park 

By Jenny Holzer

(via jonny-greenwood)

FILED UNDER: jenny holzer,

class-snuggle:

His body isn’t even cold yet and the New York times has already put out a shameful article declaring Nelson Mandela to be an “icon of peaceful resistance”. News outlets around the Western world are hurrying to publish obituaries that celebrate his electoral victory while erasing the protracted and fierce guerrilla struggle that he and his party fought against the white supremacist South African state in order to make that victory possible. Don’t let racist, imperialist liberalism co-opt the legacy of another radical. Nelson Mandela used peaceful means when he could, and violent means when he couldn’t. For this, during his life they called him a terrorist, and after his death they’ll call him a pacifist — all to neutralize the revolutionary potential of his legacy, and the lessons to be drawn from it.

Don’t fucking let them.

(via organization)

organization:

Eva & Kevin separated

We Need to Talk About Kevin, dir. Lynne Ramsay, 2011

SOURCE: organization

'Say Something' by A Great Big World & Christina Aguilera

And I am feeling so small
It was over my head
I know nothing at all

And I will stumble and fall
I’m still learning to love
Just starting to crawl

Say something, I’m giving up on you
I’m sorry that I couldn’t get to you
Anywhere, I would’ve followed you
Say something, I’m giving up on you

humansofnewyork:

"I used to be a preschool teacher, but I got fired." “What happened?” “Well, I decided that I wanted to have a socially conscious class. So we learned about apartheid in South Africa. Then we learned about homelessness. Then we made mother’s day cards for Trayvon Martin’s mom. And I think the principal decided that it was too much for three and four year olds, because she told me I wasn’t a ‘good fit.’ But honestly, I was just shining too bright for them. And now she’s going to see me on Humans of New York, and she’ll be sorry!”

humansofnewyork:

"I used to be a preschool teacher, but I got fired."
“What happened?”
“Well, I decided that I wanted to have a socially conscious class. So we learned about apartheid in South Africa. Then we learned about homelessness. Then we made mother’s day cards for Trayvon Martin’s mom. And I think the principal decided that it was too much for three and four year olds, because she told me I wasn’t a ‘good fit.’ But honestly, I was just shining too bright for them. And now she’s going to see me on Humans of New York, and she’ll be sorry!”

organization:

" The model has become the emblem of this dislocation, revered for the youth and beauty that we all strive for and yet reviled for her symbolic perfection. She is viewed as “unreal,” the channel for both desires for and disgust with the female body, feelings that can be explored in the realm of fashion, but that would be difficult to express in other ways. The boundaries of acceptability have been routinely stretched; it is a requirement for each new generation of designers and stylists to renegotiate the relationship between body, style and morality. In the 1990s this has been a precarious balancing act between eroticism and violence. Models are shown in ever more brutal images that both flout and fear the anxieties of decay, disease and physical abuse.
Juergen Teller’s photographs of the model Kristen McMenemy taken in 1996 highlight this desire to go beyond the artifice of the fashion image to depict the body as fallible, as open to pain and fatigue. They express the contemporary obsession with images that are “real,” that are often quite harshly lit, exposing the skin as mottled and tired, showing up bruises and flaws rather than smoothing away any sign of the living/dying flesh. While this realist style is in itself a convention, a particular way of viewing the world, focusing on the potential romance of the everyday, the mundane, Teller’s photographs undoubtedly assert a different view of the previously unassailable supermodel body. The Süddeutsche Zeitung commissioned the pictures for the cover of its supplement on the theme of fashion and morality. Teller wanted to make a comment on the sanitized perfection of traditional fashion magazine covers, and the oppressive standards of beauty to which they adhere. He said of such cover images “To me, most of them look hideous. They don’t show the human aspects of the girl. I don’t understand the retouching. They look like aliens to me. They say Kristen McMenemy is a supermodel and that’s how they show her. I just wanted to say, listen, this is her” (Teller quoted in Frankel 1998).”Rebecca Arnold, “The Brutalized Body,” Fashion Theory

organization:

" The model has become the emblem of this dislocation, revered for the youth and beauty that we all strive for and yet reviled for her symbolic perfection. She is viewed as “unreal,” the channel for both desires for and disgust with the female body, feelings that can be explored in the realm of fashion, but that would be difficult to express in other ways. The boundaries of acceptability have been routinely stretched; it is a requirement for each new generation of designers and stylists to renegotiate the relationship between body, style and morality. In the 1990s this has been a precarious balancing act between eroticism and violence. Models are shown in ever more brutal images that both flout and fear the anxieties of decay, disease and physical abuse.

Juergen Teller’s photographs of the model Kristen McMenemy taken in 1996 highlight this desire to go beyond the artifice of the fashion image to depict the body as fallible, as open to pain and fatigue. They express the contemporary obsession with images that are “real,” that are often quite harshly lit, exposing the skin as mottled and tired, showing up bruises and flaws rather than smoothing away any sign of the living/dying flesh. While this realist style is in itself a convention, a particular way of viewing the world, focusing on the potential romance of the everyday, the mundane, Teller’s photographs undoubtedly assert a different view of the previously unassailable supermodel body. The Süddeutsche Zeitung commissioned the pictures for the cover of its supplement on the theme of fashion and morality. Teller wanted to make a comment on the sanitized perfection of traditional fashion magazine covers, and the oppressive standards of beauty to which they adhere. He said of such cover images “To me, most of them look hideous. They don’t show the human aspects of the girl. I don’t understand the retouching. They look like aliens to me. They say Kristen McMenemy is a supermodel and that’s how they show her. I just wanted to say, listen, this is her” (Teller quoted in Frankel 1998).”

Rebecca Arnold, “The Brutalized Body,” Fashion Theory

SOURCE: organization
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